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20121222
20121230
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's education. people say that federal loans have card caps of $5,000-$7,000 per year. you can only borrow a total of $33,000 for undergrad. but that is not looking at the parent portion of the picture. the parent portion allows you to borrow as much as you need, to fill the unmet need, to pay your child's way to get to a particular school. there is a credit check that is very modest and there is not a check on income. but as costs have grown, perhaps the limits we have had on federal student loans do not meet the needs the students and families are experiencing when they are trying to pay for college. you see the growth in the program where more parents are borrowing from this program. recipients have doubled in the past decade, and they are borrowing more money as well. we thought it was emblematic of the shift in the system. >> would you say the apparent lack of paycheck is one of the most consistent missing pieces? if someone has an income of $10,000 a year, they can take out a loan for $30,000. >> if they do not have a negative credit history, and we could have a larger conversation a
. but i do believe in education. i believe we should invest in our education systems. smaller classes. no high-capacity schools, because they produce morons. the great and the good want their kids to have the best. you mentioned something that i disagree with. the reason why american consumers consume more than europeans is not a cause of some kind of fundamental cultural difference. what you have -- first, america was the only country that had been effectively untouched by the war. so you had more consumption for durables. i am not sure that americans -- naturally, americans would be the first to enjoy them. then, after that, what you have is a massive reduction in the real wage, the real median wage. i do not know if you know that. today we do not have a real median wage that is anywhere near where it was in 1972. what has been the effect between 1970's and 2008 is that living standards were being pushed into the ground, hours were being expanded to make ends meet. real hourly wages were declining. they were working longer hours. that put enormous strain on families. my friends in
will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccollum, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that something is up and they are usually right. sometimes we go fo
morning. thank you for educating people on your television show. we live in a community where we are experiencing exactly what you're talking about, particularly businesses, and i am talking big businesses. they do not like where the doors are located, or this department over here, and what they are doing is restricting jobs and tax base. i would encourage people to get involved in your institute and fight this because it is not doing anything for the economy or our country. merry christmas to everybody. host: john, thank you for the call. what is the history of the cato institute, founded in 1977? guest: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin
regarding their voting records and actions in regard to, say, equity in education and access to health care and fiar pay. and i actually have to say i link the fairness and focus on just this in regard to domestic issues and international issues. i do not apply those values just to u.s. citizens but to apply the same desires for fairness and justice with regard to our foreign policy, u.s. foreign- policy. i do find that my religious upbringing does -- is interwoven in however prison as. host: rich from tennessee. independent caller. caller: merry christmas, greta. host: good morning, merry christmas. caller: i echo the last caller. i would say my politics changed from republican to it independent. i voted the constitution party the last presidential election. but i found that most people who are serious voters do consider moral beliefs, our laws are based on morality. whether the source is a religion or their own sense of morality which they probably borrowed from other religions, how can you not consider morality and believes when you are voting? otherwise, you are simply pushing a lever b
commercial and educational objectives that can be achieved at the moon. the case for human a mission to astroid should be visionary the focus on practical applications. this is a reflect did -- reflection of the values we hold. it is not just our dna. it is our values. be our nation not defined by blood or religion but a conscious choice. in shaping the international environment for space activity, the u.s. should build a more prosperous world in which our values are taken beyond. we should also exercise some humility in facing the unknown. in their time these projects were controversial and criticized. who today would have said they should not have been done? we have seen these efforts to define us as a nation who pioneers the next frontier. we are all in this together, white house, congress, international partners and many u.s. companies that operate the capabilities. in think this committee for holding this hearing today. i will be happy to answer any questions you might have. >> thank you. i think all of you for your testimony. the committee limits questioning to five minutes for
powell. [applause] we are thrilled to have our local and national education and safety leaders here to discuss the promise neighborhood program and how we promote safety in our schools. i have been a principal and excited and delighted principal in this community for 80 years. i know how hard families work a day in and day out to achieve academically support each other and the community and to make sure our children have six classrooms, said playgrounds -- safe classrooms, safe playgrounds, and save homes to welcome them. this school has been a proud a partner of the thomas neighborhood initiative. i realize some of our struggling students addressing these challenges in the class term alone was not going to be enough to help get them on the path to success and achieve what we know they are capable of in the future. we need to work with a broader coalition of partners to address their needs outside of the classroom, in the home, on the streets in the community. i am so thankful to our founder. [applause] for starting this hard work, they have continued the hard work over the past yea
much of a formal education that had a ph.d. in life. and she heard that john f. kennedy was coming. it was days before the 1960 election and she thought i should see it. so she put me on top of a mailbox on this huge boulevard and i watched as this canyon filled in with people. and this very charismatic young man -- i was hooked. i did not know what he was saying. i did not understand what he was saying. how was not that precocious. and i knew it was very important. it was very exciting. now i know from google what he said and part of what he said was i am not running on a platform that says if you elect me things will be easy. being an american 6 in 1960 is very hazardous but with hope we will decide which path we take. i thought back at those words over the last four years because it was parallel to another young candidate. jesse barry had a very difficult life as she had hoped for the future. and i think about what she would have thought, knowing that that little boy shook on the mailbox would be working for the president and that president would be named barack obama. it is inc
. it is largely the education department, and the veterans affairs department. the identity will either be -- we have multiple generations. i love the things we are doing with the startup company. let me make this a little bit bigger. up until a few months ago, they decided they did not want to publish how many forms there were. there were over 6000 forms and the federal government. there were over 4000 data sets. how do you go from 6000 data collection forms to 400,000 datacenter is? -- datacenters? incidentally, over the last few years, there have been five forms. my portion of the world, in the grand arena, you have three pavement agencies. 3/4 of the federal grants, and the system that goes along with a vat is payment management. -- with that is payment management. we try to work with the department to get this rectified. then, they have to agree on identity. not that they couldn't agree, but it has such a huge ripple effect because there are so many different generations. i think that is step one. >> what do you mean the identity management system? >> the first thing is the policy on identi
education. i have read in this book, -- partly they think it is normal. justice kennedy goes over to china lot. -- goes over to china in a lot. what would you say? we wrote down eight or nine. ultimately, what you're working towards is a general understanding. i found my own way of expressing that. of what that understanding has to be. maybe you can get there. when i saw the apartheid in south africa, it meant something to me. i looked at the television and on the television, there is a woman, well dressed, well- educated woman, well spoken. she is black. she says the following. country? our situation is not normal. how did you get people to think that is normal to follow a rule of law and follow the judges even when the judges decide something you think is wrong and even when it is unpopular? the problem is put to me by those students at the university. you have to have an independent judiciary. how do you do that? tell them they cannot be fired. they will love that. and then you tell them we will not cut your pay. which we don't live up to here, by the way. they will like that, too. i he
of advocating for him -- jeanne appointed me to my first public role to advocate on an education commission. that is what got me familiar with the new hampshire legislature and ultimately led to my first run for office. >> carol, were you born aspiring for politics? >> i grew up in a large irish catholic family. my parents took in every child who needed it. we had three generations in the house. i was pressed into political service when i was 6 years old because my parents were active republicans. i carried the signs and whatever. i thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, sh
and well. the things he has done, whether it is health reform or education reform, making higher education more affordable, expanding pell grants, creating the consumer financial protection bureau. they are all aimed at one thing -- to create a economy in which we have a vital middle-class and our tax policy reflects that as well. opportunity is broadly available. i think that is solidly in the mainstream of the democratic party. we can have a debate about means of achieving that, and i think we have to do some soul- searching about how in the 21st century we achieve those goals, and whether all the avenues and pathways that made sense 50 and 60 and 70 years ago are still valid today. many of them may be -- some may not. on the fundamental goals, he is solidly in the position of the democratic party, solidly progressive. i think that is a lot of what the election was about. >> in this election it has been observed that much of the advertising was predominantly negative. i would like to ask -- i know both sides of campaigns engaged in this. including an obama at that scene to insinuate that
to grow up. i feel like if you do these little things, in the education system from sixth grade through 12th grade every year -- everyone knows who george washington is, but you should have a class every year that allows you to live in a better neighborhood and allows you to buy a home, and giving people a credit, and allows them to get a car with a low-interest rate. guest: a real problem in american education is we are no longer in a position to require high personal standards. good example, when i was in college, i got a piece of paper when i was a freshman, i went to a state teachers college in new york state, wonderful institution. they said we expect our students and i read with to endure to my personal standards or we will throw you out of here. that's basically what the paper said. that then filters down. we don't have that anymore. instead we hear about people come from different backgrounds and different cultures. i came from different backgrounds and a difficult to prevent him from an italian immigrant family in new york city. my father was aborted or salesman. his father was a
founders were not so foolish as to suppose that freedom can thrive or survive without appropriate education and nourishments of character. they understood this must mean education broadly understood to include not just schools, but all the institutions of civil society that explain freedom and equip citizens with the virtues freedom requires. these virtues includes self- control, modernization. these reinforce the rationality essential to human happiness. notice when madison like the founding father's generally spoke of human nature, he was not speaking as modern progressives do as manage inconstant, something evolving, something constantly formed and reformedly changing social and other historical forces. when people today speak of nature, they generally speak of flora and trees and animals and other things not human. but the founders spoke of nature as a guide to and as a measure of human action. they thought of nature not as something merely to be manipulated for human convenience but rather as a source of norms to be discovered. they understood that natural rights could not be asserted,
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
million over five years to develop a sustainable public health education campaign to address the pervasive public health problem of tobacco use in kids. we are looking forward to coming back to you again for the future to tell you how this campaign will be unveiled, how it will be launched, and how we focus on many parts of the youth population to send a message of prevention. overall, the survey is still valuable because of reports usage rates not just for tobacco but all illicit drugs and alcohol as well. when you put it altogether, some 40% of 10th graders and about half of 12th graders are using at least one if not several of these substances. we must work together to prevent -- we must work together for prevention to force alcohol control policies, trade environments that empower young people not to drink or use other drugs for use tobacco, identify alcohol and other drug abuse disorders early and provide brief intervention, referral, and treatments and reduce inappropriate access to a use of prescription drugs. i am grateful to the doctor who has supported a robust research portfolio
by this incredible will that he had and nursed for education. -- thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that your. -- year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 19641965. he opposed martial -- in 1964 and 1965. he oppose richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues that result on civil rights -- you got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd that's on the le
real innovative and creative with what they're doing in education. we see what they've done in florida to create more choices. in louisiana particularly. forced by hurricane katrina to start a new system, in effect, and they see that more choices and students for parents to choose are helping low-income at-risk kids, minority kids. we can see it working. and it's not political. it's an american idea to give parents more choices to put their children in an environment that they can succeed. it's an idea that works. we can look around the country at states that try to create a more business-friendly environment, not because they're for businesses or for any political reason or they're for special interests, but they know the only way to get jobs and prosperity and create opportunity is to create an environment where businesses can thrive. we make it political here. and we ask our constituents to make choices between employers and employees. but states like texas have created a business-friendly environment with lower taxes and less regulation. they've passed some laws that reduce the ris
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has grown. these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for it. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and you have to do battle with th
more off the free stuff. another thing that i would do would change the education system to where in your senior year and you decide whether you will go on to college or be a blue-collar worker. if you are going to be a blue- collar worker, you go into apprenticeships for the last year of high school plan that particular field, because now these high school people get out of high school and they don't know how to change a light bulb and they end up not having a skill and they don't have the money to go to school for whatever reason and they don't learn a skill. so they end up on the welfare system. if you took that last year of high school and taught them a skill, then they would have a skill and able to earn money and not go on welfare. host: let's leave it there, jim. on facebook -- brad in victorville, california. good morning. are you with us? last chance. we will move on to doreen in connecticut. caller: i'm a small business owner. host: what kind of business? caller: i do alterations. in the evening return our business into a zumba class for ladies. my daughter and i seem to
as did finding myself in this arena in having this incredible awakening and education. since i left the duke ellington school, i have often gone back to give master classes and work with young singers. my agency would often scheduled concert with master classes. again known in the industry has teaching younger -- i get known in the industry as teaching younger students. we have a number of to the -- we have a number of tickets we give away or offer at a discounted price. i remember when i was a student and saw my first opera. it was because the kennedy center and extended a certain amount of tickets for students to come. i realized there is a tremendous responsibility. it is also a pleasure to want to share this gorgeous art form with people and young people in particular. i know the impact and difference it made in my life have been known at 13 this is what i wanted to do. it gave me a direction and purpose. i never suffered under pressure of my desire to keep up with the latest. when i would go to a voice lesson or concert, there was no synthetic that could provide me with that ki
the individual, military did education and training? -- education and training? i agree that you have to start at the provincial and district level. which is the right model to go with here? mr. affleck, you talked about 27 different militia types of groups. when we try to focus on couple, which does not -- kabul, which is not extent beyond the city limits. what has to come first for us to be on the track to success? >> it to get international security assistance peace right and you have african nations, including uganda and rwanda and participate, that gives you some breathing space to move on. that is the essential thing that first. to happen first brok >> you have to deal with governments, but obviously creating greater security -- >> governments at which level? "you cannot frankly do real governance of the provisional level with governors unless you're dealing with the capital, because of the nature of the congolese government. you start where you are, and you have monusco, with no real effectiveness, try to bring in units or create a new unit within it that has that capacity. if i were fo
the educational stuff, all the policy-making situations. i think it is a great thing the washington, d.c. has all these things and c-span covers these. >> c-span, created in 1979 as a public service. >> james glanz is an investigative reporter with the "new york times." mr. glanz, what is an internet datacenter? >> it is a place where all the information you sent out from your communicatocomputer or mobe goes into process and storage. >> how big are these centers? >> there actually colossal. their colossal in the amount of electricity they use. some use as much electricity as a medium-sized town. it is a very secretive industry. they tend to be hiding in plain sight. littlees you'll see diesel generators on the side. those are backup power supplies. and it is a data center. >> were those located at the road they're all over the place. they're in high rises in cities, in greenfield sites out in suburban areas, there tucked away in the back of offices. they are the way that most commerce takes place now. everyone has to have one. there are concentrations of the in the country. northern virginia, si
effort. is the education, this plan -- the discipline. congolese military is riddled with problems, but just the simple training and discipline and has made a difference. we have ongoing efforts on the rule of law and military justice. we spend millions of dollars to work with the military during a wholesale way on mentor ship and to make sure that human rock -- human rights and the law are instilled drought. -- instill that throughout. >> and where you have seen efforts not working at all, where is it? is it the same? >> again, the challenges are paramount. these are forces that do not howff a great amount of discipline. they do not have great training. enda in many cases, they do not have great education. there is a capacity problem within the drc, and it makes it harder to try to train them up in a way that meets the standards that we would like to see in the military. >> would you like to comment further? gregg's yes, i would. -- >> yes, i would. i would like to say that security sector reform in the army has been a failure, for the most part. it is a failure because of all of
to avoid cuts to our investments in the future -- infrastructure, education. those kind of investments bring more money to the treasury. the conversation i have had with the president last night, i know he believes we must avoid the cliff, and we need to get something done. i cannot explain to anybody what the path the republicans took this week was about. how was that about? what were they trying to prove? first, they had the $250,000 that would be on the floor. i thought republicans would vote for it. that is why they pulled it. then, they have this $1 million plant, this $50,000 christmas gift to people making over $1 million a year, paid for by a $1,000 increase to the middle- class. when the president asked the leader, what is the mood? how you see this from your perspective? i say to him what i say to you. i do not know what their bottom line is. i do not know if they know what their bottom line is. it would be interesting for them to tell you. the bottom line is what i just described in the bill yesterday. $50,000 if you make over $1 million. if you are a senior on meals and whe
without some investment in infrastructure or education and the like, our recovery may falter and then given what is going on in europe and much of the world, that would be bad news. i think the number one job is to keep us on good, sound, fiscal standing and he has to deal with some of these outstanding issues. then you move on and you start to see things like education and how we deal with education in this country and the need for reform continues to be out there. working with the education secretary, it is going to occupy a bitter moment for this president. americans believe in education and of the it is the first step on that ladder to upward mobility. that is going to be a challenge that this president has to deal with them than he has to find these issues and then define them in terms of common ground. host: juan williams joining us on this christmas day. joining us from texas, this is ken. go ahead. caller: good morning. merry christmas. i live in texas. the people in east texas -- i don't mean to say it, but white people really do not like this president. you can list
part-time or summer hire. we never did get into the education thing at all. we are focused on doing a job. my point on education is that there is something revolutionary that needs to happen. if you look now in the internet age and realize the rate at which a student downloads information -- the people who are really smart are bored. i think within maybe 20-25 years, you won't see a classroom typically like we do, where you see everybody goes to a classroom. it is for that reason, it is not a good thing to teach people who are going to be innovators later on. next question. >> thank you very much for your talk. what skills, academic, etc., do you need at early ages to facilitate creativity and innovation? how can parents and schools shape these attributes for kids? >> in answering that, i am going to focus on word that you said. you said cultivate. the point i have tried to make is that if things are going around in the world outside of the kid's community, outside of his local interface and outside of his school, if he sees wonderful progress happen, that is so different -- that is
medicare, children's programs, education, infrastructure, and it threatens our economy as a whole. does anyone really believe there is not a single dollar to be saved anywhere in the pentagon? the american people have spoken. they have made it loud and clear they want a balanced approach that casts the wealthiest americans to pay a little bit more. it protect our seniors, children, and our most vulnerable neighbors. the republican leaders refuse to listen. let me say another thing. i would say my republican freshman colleague -- i remember the promises of things you said would change. i would say, you own this now. you have officially become part of the problem, if not the problem. it is a vote against accountability. let me say this, my republican friends have made it on fashionable to worry about the poor and the elderly and the vulnerable. i urge my colleagues not to turn your backs on the most needy. let's balance our budget in a way that does not lower the quality of life or decrease the standard of living. we can do so much better. instead of doing this, you should be negotiating
washington. there is so much to be done on jobs, income, education, and energy. we are a week away from one of the worst tragedies in memory. so we have got work to do on gun safety. a host of other issues. these are all challenges we can meet. these are all colleges we have to meet, if we want our kids to grow up in america that is full of opportunity and possibility, as much opportunity and possibility that our parents and our grandparents left for us. but we are only going to be able to do it together. we are going to have to find some common ground. the challenge we have got right now is that the american people are a lot more sensible and a lot more thoughtful, and much more willing to compromise and give and sacrifice and act responsibly, than their elected representatives are. that is a problem. there is a mismatch between how everybody else is thinking about these problems, democrats and republicans up side of this town, and how folks are acting here. we have to get the aligned. and we only have 10 days to do that. i hope every member of congress is thinking about that. nobody can g
you give parents more choices of education, it helps all children, low-income children, minority children. we see it all over the country and we can prove it with real research. when states have the right to develop their own energy, like we've seen in north dakota and pennsylvania, the revenues that come into the government help to build better roads, better schools, and keep taxes lower. that's an opportunity i hope we can have in south carolina. and when states can control more of their transportation and infrastructure dollars that can be more efficient and do much better than we are or what we can do now under the federal regime, so the principles of freedom are working all over the country. we need to spotlight them, showcase them, communicate them all over the country, so that people see that these ideas work and at the same time, they're going to be able to look to washington over the next few years and see that the ideas that are in place are not working. they're dragging us down. and so when washington hits a wall, which we know they will, the friends of freedom here in
their education, purchase homes and run their businesses. that is what we need to address credit reports, one of the most significant and least understood elements of the consumer credit system. this benefits another highlight of dodd-frank. in the past the federal trade commission has had authority over furnitures, those who send financial information to the credit bureaus. they are in most cases of banks. the ftc did not have the authority to examine the credit bureaus themselves, they could only bring in enforcement actions. the cfcb has said the authority to shed new light on the credit reporting industry about which we do not know much in many ways and write new rules of the road. as one reason why the cfpb is so important. consumers are entitled to one free copy each year, one from each of the three bureaus of they choose to do that, they find only one in five consumer's request a copy of their credit union report in at any given year. last year 8 million consumers disputed items enter their credit report challenging the accuracy and enter one way or the other, even though each american
told us about welfare? nothing. what has he told us about his education plan? nothing. the fact is he has got absolutely nothing to offer except for the same old something for nothing culture that got us in this mess in the first place. >> a democratic society -- will the prime minister -- >> order, order. members must now come down. -- calm down. it is the questions and the answers must be heard. therefore seek assurances from the commissioner of the metropolitan police that no stone will be left unturned in getting to the full truth about allegations that a police officer suffocated evidence against a member of the cabinet? >> let me say, at christmastime, it is right to pay tribute to break police officers, men and women who look after us around the clock and do an extremely good job. but the point my honorable friend has made is important. a police officer posing as a member of the public and sending an e-mail to blacken the name of a cabinet minister is a serious issue and needs to be investigated. the metropolitan police service truth of this matter as quick as complaints commis
. but i do believe in education. i believe we should invest in our education systems. smoker -- smaller class is. -- now one high a capacity schools because they produce morons. the great and the good want their kids to have the best. you mentioned something that i dis agree with. the reason why american consumers consume more than europeans is not a cause of some kind of punishment -- fundamental cultural difference. what you have -- first, america was the only country that had been effectively untouched by the war. so you had more consumption for durables. i am not sure that americans -- naturally, americans would be the first to enjoy them. then, after that, what you have is a massive reduction in the real wage, the real median wage. i do not know if you know that. today we do not have a real median wage that is anywhere near where it was in 1976. -- 1972. what has been the effect between 1970's and 2008 is that living standards were being pushed into the ground, hours were being expanded to make ends meet. real hourly wages were declining. they were working longer hours. output enor
education and basic training programs we can help -- lift the congolese army up and get them closer to the standards we want to see in the military, i want to stress that is still a relatively modest investment of our money and time. we find we're able to get a fairly large return on that investment in terms of the output. it is no secret that if we were to seek further defense cuts -- see further defense cuts, we would have to take a close look at all of these. even as modest as the expenditures countrurrently are. >> give that some thought, and if you could get back to us with the record on that, and pull together the best you can the dollars that we're spending. are they adequate? give us some idea of apartheid station. we of got to look at all of that in the grand -- the total spending. >> i would like to ask the panel what you feel like with regard to m23, their ultimate aims. do you feel like they're a threat is subsiding, or it is possible that could lead to a new regional war? >> i will take that question. the m23 is basically a rebel group. how they believe that the terms o
that the department of energy or the department of education and the number of employees they have. we do not need all that. they can cut the number of employees in half and we would have real savings. nobody will address these issues. i'll hang up. guest: when you have a budget in washington, it is hard to cut back politically. if you do, people say you are against the were the goal. this worthy goal, that worthy goal. there was a british historian in the 1950's. after world war i, britain had the largest navy in the world and they reduced the size of the navy. the laid-off sailors and dock workers. the agency running the navy was getting bigger as the navy was getting smaller. he made the discovery -- the size of a bureaucracy has nothing to do with the amount of work the bureaucracy does. it will grow unless it is reined in. the bureaucracy was getting bigger. if you get that kind of bloat, get in trouble and you change or go out of business. ronald reagan said the closest thing to immortality is a government agency. caller: good morning, everybody. do you think capitalism and privatizing is withdr
was astonishing. he was driven primarily by this incredible will that he had and thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time.
to get the education that they needed in a small community setting that might not have been able to do it. yes, he was the old school which and it was old school that should teach us a lesson or two. as a member of the appropriations committee for 41 years, he led us by example. 41 years. he came in 1971 and became the chairman in 2009 leading by example, he showed how we can abbling accomplish great things by working together which he saw we could have a stronger country, a stronger economy and yet have a sense of fru gallonty. he treated the minority party with great respect. all have spoken about his ledge dare friendship with ted stevens. but now as senator cochran was serving as the ranking member he called him as vice chairman and i know he was ready to reach out to senator shelby who astumed roles. he knew we needed the input of all senators to enact our bills and craft our bills. he shared on the indian affairs committee. he was the first chairman of the select committee on intelligence. there will be those that will read his resume in hawaii. i hope they don't say he came here to
and continued to see many of them who are our brightest stars, who are educated and want to be so much a part of the american dream. just because they don't have a paper that says they are here legitimately, most don't know any other country, this is their home. >> we have some students and they will ask questions later. as a bit of advice for high- school teenage kids to want to work at the white house or would like to be in the president's cabinet sunday, what do you say to them? what is important for them to remember? >> volunteer, get involved in your community, i mean that. whether you are applying for college or jobs, people want to know where you put your priorities. are you volunteering for a cause? are you helping our neighborhood? are you tutoring? what are you doing with that extra time you have? i think that is really important for young people in high school. attach yourself to other folks that you want to learn from. it is not so much about being in the 'in' crowd because that changes, is about being prepared. >> were you popular girl? >> i don't think so. [laughter] >> are you
of mechanisms. we have consumer education and division. we develop blogs end contents that gets distributed to all kinds of community partners. we also make sure people are aware of research that shows what the benefits are of people saying their credit reports and knowing them and knowing their credit scores. there is a recent article from the federal reserve bank of boston that shows some of the potential benefits of consumers knowing their scores when they apply for credit and not knowing their scores. i want to point out power constituent offices where we do special outrage to service members. have an office of students and an office of older americans and those offices have developed specialized channels for communicating what in particular about credit reports and scores is important for those particular groups to know and we are trying to make the message available to each of those groups at the most taechable small men's. >> thank you very much. may i then ask you to give my regards to holly petraeus. she did to map to hawaii to talk to us about financial literacy and did a great jo
:00 p.m. eastern with both as early as 6:30. legislation ranging from better rents and education to foreign aid. the house rules committee is planning on a possible meeting sunday to discuss terms for a fiscal cliff deal that could be on the floor as early as monday. watch live coverage of the u.s. house tomorrow here on c-span. >> more news on the fiscal cliff negotiations. according to the hill, president obama monitor talks from the white house and has indicated he would support legislation that would raise taxes on those who earn more than $400,000. harry reid has scheduled a democratic caucus meeting for tomorrow afternoon to discuss any potential deals. minority leader mitch mcconnell says he would do the same period in the house, speaker john boehner has said the senate must act first on legislation to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. >> tomorrow on washington journal, the latest on the so- called fiscal cliff. with local columnist -- with roll call columnist. followed by a look at president obama's cabinet for a second term. our guest is david jackson. then a look at wha
educators who were taken from us will be laid to rest. we may never know all the reasons why this tragedy happened. we do know that every day since, more americans have died of gun violence. we know such violence has terrible consequences for our society. and if there is even one thing that we can do to prevent any of these events, we have a deep obligation -- all of us -- to try. over these past five days, a discussion has reemerged as to what we might do not only to deter mass shootings in the future, but to reduce the epidemic of gun violence that plagues this country every single day. and it's encouraging that people of all different backgrounds and beliefs and political persuasions have been willing to challenge some old assumptions and change longstanding positions. that conversation has to continue. but this time, the words need to lead to action. we know this is a complex issue that stirs deeply held passions and political divides. and as i said on sunday night, there's no law or set of laws that can prevent every senseless act of violence in our society. we're going to need to wo
a little bit of my real, real concern. i'm a former educator for years. and i sat at a desk and listened to parents that would actually sit down and cry that they just didn't know what in the world to do with their child, and they can't control them, and the child is at 10-14 years old. both of those parents work and leave children alone. i think the real, real, real problem and the real solution, and it's just like the former person that just called saying about the guns are out there. they are going to get them whether they get them legally or not, mental illness. you've got deal with that. but, and government rest her soul, the mother of this boy that did the shooting was killed by her own guns that she made available to that young man and taught him and took him to the gun range to shoot it, and i know that she was educated enough to understand that that child had a problem. what kind of parent would allow him to have access to those guns? he went out and -- host: sorry dean. that's dean in kansas, a member of the n.r.a. a couple of identity ms on facebook. host: lynn in hunting town
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